(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Tips to teachers"

F37 
8:S98 

1980/81 CO 
Teacher 



Tips To Teachers 

by Adeline McCall 




North Carolina Symphony 
Chamber Orchestra 



Children's Concerts 
1980-1981 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/tipstoteacher1981mcca 



TIPS TO TEACHERS 

Copyright by Adeline McCall, 19 8 



The North Carolina Symphony 
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
CHILDREN'S CONCERTS 
1980 — 1981 Season 



TIPS TO TEACHERS 

by Adeline McCall 
CONTENTS 

2 Getting Ready for your North Carolina Symphony Orchestra Concert 

3 Children's Concert Program and List of Recordings — Season 1980 - 1981 

4 Some Suggestions on Concert Preparation 

5 Notes on the Children's Program 

5-8 OVERTURE — "Abu Hassan" 

9-10 HOLBERG SUITE, Op. 40 — Grieg 
Prelude 
Rigaudon 

11 Song: OLEANA — Norwegian Folk Song 

12 MARCH OF THE SIAMESE CHILDREN from "The King and I" — Rodgers 

13-14 SYMPHONY No. 100 in G Major ("Military") — Haydn 
Menuetto 
Finale 

15 COLONEL BOGEY MARCH — Alford 

16 Song: I MAY NOT PASS THIS WAY AGAIN — McKuen 

17 L'ARLESIENNE — SUITES NO. 1 and NO. 2 — Bizet 

18 Movement 

19 Some Suggestions to New Teachers 

20 Warm-up Ideas to Initiate Creative Movement 

21 Finger Painting 

22-23 Bibliography — Books, Films, and Filmstrips 



North Carolina Symphony P. 0. Box 28026 Raleigh, N. C. 27611 

Jackson Parkhurst, Director of Education 



GETTING READY 
for your 
NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Start as early as possible to publicize the coming of the 
NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
to your community 

1. Through pictures and articles in local papers 

2. Through radio and television announcements 

3. Through memos to parents 

SEE THAT Principals, Teachers and School Administrators have correct information 

on the DATE, THE DAY OF THE WEEK, and THE HOUR of the children's concert set in 

their schedules. Avoid conflicts by checking with the School Superintendent 
before sending out notices. 

BE SURE TO INFORM Cafeteria Managers, Librarians, Teachers' Aides and Assistants 
about the concert. 

FOLLOW UP with announcements at teachers' meetings, P T A meetings, and on 
bulletin boards. 

ARRANGE FOR A DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION to work out bus schedules, and notify 
local police to cooperate in providing an escort, and blocking streets. 
Inform each school of the route to be taken; where to load and unload, etc. 

MAKE A SEATING PLAN FOR THE CONCERT, and send copies to all schools with directions 
for entering and leaving the concert hall. 

SCHEDULE IN-SERVICE Teachers' Workshops to prepare for the children's program. 
Invite art teachers, school librarians, special teachers, aides, and assistants. 

ORDER ALL MATERIALS 
AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE 



An important part of concert preparation is familiarizing children with the music 
through listening to recordings, and reading stories about the music and the 
composers in their classrooms. 

ORDER THE RECORDINGS. These are listed with the children's program on page 3. 
In order to facilitate the circulation of records, one complete set for 
every srx or eight teachers is recommended. 

ORDER SYMPHONY STORIES. Each child should have his own individual copy of these 
booklets. Materials printed in Symphony Stories are copyrighted, and may 
not be duplicated. 

ADDRESS ALL ORDERS TO: 

North Carolina Symphony, Jackson Parkhurst, Director of Education 
P. 0. Box 28026, Raleigh, N. C 27611 



The North Carolina Symphony... Season 1980-1981 

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 

Lawrence Leighton Smith, Artistic Advisor and Principal Guest Conductor 

James Ogle, Associate Conductor 
Jackson Parkhurst, Assistant Conductor 
Benjamin F. Swalin, Conductor Emeritus 



WEBER 



GRIEG 



FOLK SONG 



RODGERS 



HAYDN 



ALFORD 



SONG 



BIZET 



CHILDREN'S CONCERT 



Overture — "Abu Hassan" 



PROGRAM 

Recordings 

London ffrr 
Stereo 
STS 15056 



Holberg Suite, Op. 40 
Oleana 

March of the Siamese Children from 
"The King and I" 

Symphony No. 100 in G Major ("Military") 
Menuetto 
Finale 

Colonel Bogey March 

I May Not Pass This Way Again 



L'Arlesienne Suite No. 1 
Minuet 

L'Arlesienne Suite No. 2 
Farandole 



Turnabout 
TVS 34404 

Exploring Music, 5 
Holt, Rinehart & 
Winston 

B L #54 

Bowmar Orch . Lib. 

M 34126 
Columbia 



B L #54 

Bowmar Orch. Lib. 

Exploring Music, 5 
Holt, Rinehart & 
Winston 

B L #78 

Bowmar Orch. Lib. or 

PMC 7024 Stereo 

Quintessence 



In presenting these recordings to children it is important to 
establish a feeling for QUIET LISTENING. 
Play them over a number of times 
before any dance movement 
or other activity is 
suggested. 



SOME SUGGESTIONS ON CONCERT PREPARATION 



1. The purpose of your in-service teachers' workshops is to present the music 

to be played at the children's concert. Have the 
recordings assembled in order to demonstrate various 
ways of bringing the music to life. Ask teachers to 
participate by offering suggestions and demonstrating 
their ideas. 

1) Teach the two songs 

2) Teach the percussion score 

3) Show films and filmstrips 

4) Demonstrate creative movement 

5) Suggest art activities 

6) Encourage original writing on various 
phases of the program 

2. Give the children's concert program to all school librarians. See that the 
recordings are catalogued and made ready for circulation. Ask the libra- 
rarians as resource teachers to plan for the showing of related films and 
filmstrips; to set aside reference shelves for books about the music, and 
for biographies of the composers; to include information about the music 
and the composers in their scheduled story hours. 

3. Classroom teachers have a most important role in making symphony preparation 
an interesting and enjoyable experience. In some elementary schools teachers 
plan "mini-workshops," sharing their ideas and demonstrating various aspects 
of their children's activities with others. In an auditorium or multi- 
purpose room, three or four grades can assemble for an hour of more. It 
should be the responsibility of one class to have the floor or stage cleared, 
and to set up the record player in advance. 

4. In schools with central public address systems, special programs may be 
presented for classroom listening. The symphony-related programs could be 
planned by a principal, an interested parent, a musician from the community, 
a child, or a group of children. 

5. Players in high school or junior high school orchestras are sometimes 
available to bring their instruments and give a classroom demonstration. 

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES 

Learn to recognize the orchestral instruments by signt and sound. Read books 
and view filmstrips or films related to the symphony orchestra. Write and 
illustrate stories about composers and their music. 

Paint murals, posters, pictures; construct simple percussion instruments. 
Create free movement after listening to the recordings; dance to the music. 
Write a puppet play; make the puppets and construct a stage; perform for 
other classes. Make illustrated "symphony" notebooks; plan bulletin board 
displays. Get in touch with a local radio station or television station to 
find out if there might be a possible tie-in with the music to be played 
at the concert. 



THE NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY SEASON 1980 - 1981 C HAMBER ORCHESTRA 



IN THE LIVES OF YOUNG PEOPLE MUSIC CAN MEAN A GREAT DEAL. 
Early association with fine music builds many 
emotional satisfactions which carry over into 
adult life. In to-day's world children's listen- 
ing experiences are enriched by television perform- 
ances, radio programs, and by a wealth of excellent 
recordings. Yet nothing can take the place of a 
"live" symphony concert. 

The anticipation of a concert and preparation for it 
in advance help to highlight the event. But the real 
enjoyment and satisfaction of each listener will depend 
largely upon his own degree of understanding and his 
familiarity with the music. 

Children, like most people, love to hear music with 
which they are familiar. Learning to recognize a par- 
ticular piece will involve a number of listening ex- 
periences and a period of time through which to repeat 
and deepen impressions. Children also need to express 
their impressions through movement, dramatizations, 
and some form of art interpretation. 



NOTES 



N 



THE CHILDREN'S CONCERT PROGRAM 



I. OVERTURE — "Abu Hassan" 
Carl Maria von Weber 
1786 - 1826 



London ffrr 
Stereo 
STS 15056 



The Overture to Weber's comic opera, "Abu Hassan", will be the 
opening number on your Chamber Orchestra concert. This is lively, 
appealing music for children's ears. The fast tempo, the agitated 
rhythms keep up a continuous feeling of excitement throughout. 
The music is written in a series of short episodes, changing from 
minor to major and back again, finally ending in a bold, triumph- 
ant major key. Just listening may be enough to introduce this 
music. But the children may want to move to it, or play per- 
cussion instruments. If so, perhaps you could choose a "leader" 
to stand facing the group, inventing new hand and arm movements 
as the music changes. Or, if instruments are used the "leader" 
would "direct", signaling for changes from one type to another, 
from loud to soft, from slow to fast, etc. 



A discussion of the Overture as a mood-setting instrumental 
number before the opera may bring out many original comments 
from the children. Ask them what the music might suggest 
as a possible plot or story. 



The Story of "Abu Hassan" from The Arabian Nights 

During the reign of the Caliph Haroun-al-Raschid there lived at Bagdad 
a very rich merchant. He had one son, named Abou (Abu) Hassan, whom he 
educated with great success. When his son was thirty years old, the 
merchant died, leaving him great riches. Since his father had forbidden 
all forms of extravagance Abou longed to spend money. He divided his 
riches into two parts. With one half he bought land and town houses, 
the income from which he did not touch. He spent the other half lavish- 
ly, giving magnificent dinners and entertainments. In a year his money 
was spent and all his friends deserted him. He went to his mother for 
advice, and decided to give no more parties for the people of Bagdad. 
He put the income from his rents in a strong box, taking out a little 
each day to use for the strangers who came to visit Bagdad. He in- 
vited them for supper, and to spend the night. 

One day the Caliph came disguised as a merchant. Abou entertained 
him, not knowing he was the Caliph. After supper they drank wine and 
Abou told him his secret wish. He explained that Bagdad was divided 
into four quarters. In one quarter there was an imam and four old 
men who met to slander and do malicious things against him. "If I 
were the Caliph for one day," said Abou, "I would punish the imam 
with 400 lashes and each of the old men with 100 lashes." 

The Caliph listened, and poured some wine. On the sly he slipped an 
opiate powder in Abou's glass. In no time Abou became drugged. The 
Caliph ordered his slave to carry Abou to the palace, and put him in 
his bed. Then he commanded all the officers and ladies of the palace 
to take orders from Abou, pretending he was the Caliph. 

Abou woke up and saw his coverlet was cloth of gold, sparkling with 
pearls and diamonds. Then he saw the Caliph's turban, embroidered 
with jewels. A slave bowed and said, "Commander of the Faithful, it 
is time for your Majesty to rise for prayers." Abou followed his 
orders. Then he ascended the throne and held council with the 
generals, governors, and officers of state. To them he was "Monarch 
of the World from East to West, and Vicar on Earth to the Prophet sent 
of God." 

Abou Hassan could not believe he was the Caliph. He thought it was 
a dream. But he ordered an officer to go to a certain Mosque in 
Bagdad and find the imam and the four old men. "Beat them (400 for 
the imam, 100 for the others); dress them in rags; put all five 
on camels with their faces to the tails and lead them through the 
city, proclaiming loudly, 'This is the punishment for all those who 
are meddlesome.'" 

To find out if he was dreaming he called a lady of the court to 
bite his finger so he would know if he was asleep or awake. Seven 
beautiful ladies fanned him; escorted him to the dining hall where 
musicians played and danced while he was at lunch. Then later at 
dinner there were seven more beautiful ladies. 

One of the ladies, named "Cluster of Pearls," brought him some 
wine in which she had put an opiate powder. Soon Abou was fast 
asleep. The Caliph had him dressed in his own clothes and taken 
back to his home. 



When Abou Hassan woke up he still believed he was the Caliph. His 
mother believed he was crazy, and so did the neighbors. They took him 
to a lunatic asylum where he was given fifty strokes of the bastinado 
(big stick) daily to help him remember he was not the Caliph. Finally, 
he decided it had all been a dream. 

When he was released Abou Hassan went back to inviting strangers to 
supper. The Caliph came again, dressed as a merchant. After dessert 
they drank wine for some time, and the Caliph asked if he ever thought 
of getting married. "I would be glad to provide a lady for you," he 
said. So Abou agreed to drink to the health of the lady. The Caliph 
drugged him again, and his slave took him back to the palace and put 
him in a hall. There were officers, ladies and musicians there when 
he woke up. They played and danced around him. Abou was in a mood 
for cutting capers so he joined the dance, and the Caliph was much 
pleased. From this time on the Caliph and Abou became great friends. 
Abou visited the palace frequently and met Zobeide, the Caliph's wife. 
Abou fell in love with one of Zobeide's slaves, the beautiful Nouz- 
hatoul-aouadat. When they were married the festivities at the palace 
lasted for many days. The Caliph and Zobeide gave the couple very 
rich and handsome presents. So they settled down to live in great 
luxury. They gave entertainments and lavish parties — and in a 
year were penniless. 

Retold from "The Arabian Nights" - Junior Library 
Illustrated by Earle Goodenow (Grosset & Dunlap) 

The first part of the story of "Abu Hassan", as related here, was not 

used in Weber's score. His opera opens with the couple penniless, discovering 

that there is neither food or wine in the house. The characters and 

plot of Weber's version of "Abu Hassan" is printed in Symphony Stories . 

The name of Abu's wife has been changed to Fatime (Fah-teem-eh) . 

1) In discussing the story of the opera with your children it 
would be a good idea to bring out the fact that legends, fables 
and folk tales may go through many changes as they are passed down 
through the years. Can you think of any American folk tales or 
songs with different versions in different sections of the United 
States? For example: "Go tell Aunt Rhody" - "Go tell Aunt Patsy" - 
"Go tell Aunt Nancy" - etc. 

2) You might suggest reading other stories from "The Arabian Nights." 
Many children already are familiar with Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves , 
Aladdin, or The Wonderful Lamp , and Sinbad the Sailor . 

3) Older children might find it interesting to write and produce a 
play or a puppet show. Some suggested procedures: 

... Make a list of the characters in the story of "Abu Hassan." 

... Describe each one with a sentence or two. 

... Create each character in movement, dance improvisation and 
pantomime. 

... Let the children write the story in their own words, then 
choose a script for the production. 



About the Composer 



Carl Maria von Weber, noted for the establishment of a German national 
opera, not only with libretti in the German language, often based on 
national subjects, but with music unmistakably German in style. He is 
also looked upon as the founder of the Romantic School in opera. 

His father, Franz Anton von Weber (1734 - 1812) had been an army officer 
but he took up the profession of music when he was in his forties. His 
niece, Constanze Weber, was the wife of Mozart — Carl Maria's first cousin 
by marriage. 

Carl's mother was a dramatic singer of considerable talent. Both parents 
were eager for their son to have a good music education. His first teacher 
was his stepbrother, Fritz, a pupil of Joseph Haydn. He had thorough 
instruction on the piano from J. P. Heuschkel, and later became a virtuoso 
concert pianist. As a chorister in the Salzburg Cathedral he attracted 
the attention of Michael Haydn who gave him free lessons in composition. 

He became so much interested in the invention of lithography that he 
worked at it, improved the process, and printed his own Opus 2, Variations 
for Pianoforte, in 1800. 

Weber's greatest fame rests on his two masterworks, the operas Per 
Freisch'iitz and Euryanthe . 

The premiere of Der Freischiitz (a marksman who uses magic bullets) 
was a major triumph. His wife, Caroline Brandt, sang the role of 
Agathe. Weber's son describes the event in a biography of his father. 
"The curtain fell but not a soul left the house. Thunders of applause 
and thousands of voices summoned the composer before his enraptured 
audience. At last he appeared. . . . Amid the deafening shouting, 
flowers and verses were flung from all directions. The success had 
been immense, unparalleled." 

Der Freischiitz was given fifty performances in Berlin in the next 
year and a half. In 1822 it was taken to Dresden, where its Berlin 
success was repeated. The same year it was also produced in Vienna. 
Rossini attended the premiere, and is said to have remarked that the 
opera gave him the colic. But the young Viennese went wild, hailing 
the triumph of German opera. 

The Viennese impresario who had brought Der Freischiitz to Vienna 
commissioned Weber to write a new opera for his theatre. Weber 
responded with a new work which he called Euryanthe . This too proved 
to be very successful. It was first performed on October 25, 1823 
before a brilliant audience which included the Emperor himself. 

After the success of Der Freischiitz in London Weber was commissioned, 
for a magnificent sum, to write an opera in English. Although his 
health was declining he managed to finish his Oberon and conduct the 
premiere on April 12, 1826. He considered Oberon to be the crowning 
triumph of his life. But it was his last one. He never left England. 
He was found dead in bed. He was buried in London, but eighteen years 
later he was moved to Dresden. Richard Wagner wrote special music for 
the burial service and delivered the eulogy. 



II. HOLBERG SUITE, Op. 40 Turnabout 

Prelude TVS 34404 

Rigaudon 

Edvard Hagerup Grieg 

1843 - 1907 

Grieg's Holberg Suite, Op. 40, was composed in 1884 in commemoration 
of the 200th anniversary of Ludwig Holberg's birth. The Suite for 
String Orchestra was dedicated to Frau Erika Lie - Nisson. The 
instruments needed to play the Suite are 1) Violins 2) Violas 
3) Cellos and 4) Double Bass. 

In the orchestra score Baron Ludwig is described as "the MolieTe of 
the North, the creator of the modern Danish-Norwegian literature." 
He is further described on the Turnabout jacket as the Norwegian-born 
Holberg who "lived in an age when the well-born Dane was supposed to 
write Latin to his friends, talk in French with the ladies, summon 
his dogs in German, and use Danish only to swear at his servants. 
By his writing of poetry and political satire, and the writing and 
directing of plays in Danish, Holberg accomplished for Danish much 
the same thing Elias Lonnrott achieved for the Finnish tongue: he 
elevated Danish to the status of a literary language. And he had to 
do this through his own writing. His country needed a literature; he 
therefore provided it with a generous and versatile pen. History, 
science, philosophy, and politics were among the fields explored by 
Holberg for the benefit of his countrymen." 

The Grieg Suite is a fine example of the composer's genius for writing 
lyrical melodies with wistful, nostalgic undertones. If you are familiar 
with Solveig's Song from the Peer Gynt Suite you will discover some 
basic similarities in this music. 

Listening Highlights 

PRELUDE 



A - 



B - 



A' 



a fast repetitions of pattern 8 measures 

*.b smooth flowing melodies 8 measures ', 

a fast repetitions of pattern 2 measures 

c downward passages - all strings 8 measures 

d repetition of pattern - viola, then cello 8 measures 

pizzicato underneath 

repetition of pattern - bridge 4 measures 

e strong new melody - first, violins, then basses 8 measures 

b smooth flowing melodies 8 measures 

Coda 8 measures 



RIGAUDON 



A - 



B - 

A - 



pa 

a' 

*.b 
c 



brisk staccato - 2 counts to a measure 
derived from a 

strongly accented patterns - loud and soft 
bold descending final theme - loud 
smooth legato minor melody 



8 measures :|| 
10 measures 
18 measures '. 

4 measures 
35 measures 



From the beginning without repeats 



10 



About the Composer 

... Edvard Grieg was a national hero in Norway. Hans von Bulow called him 

the "Chopin of the North." Grieg himself felt that a composer "of the North" 
might imply that he belonged to all the Scandinavian countries. To clarify 
his stand that he was definitely Norwegian, not Scandinavian, he said: 
"The national characteristics of the Norwegians, Swedes, Danes are wholly 
different and their music differs just as much. I am not an exponent 
of Scandinavian music, but of Norwegian." 

... As a nationalist composer Grieg drew his inspiration from native 

folk songs and rustic dances. He never used them literally but let 
his imagination transform them into his own original rhythms and 
melodies . 

. . . Once a great Norwegian violinist and composer said to him: "Do you 
see the fjords over there — the lakes and streams, the valleys and 
forests, and the blue sky over all? They have made my music — not I. 
Frequently when I am playing, it seems to me as if I merely made mechanical 
motions and were only a silent listener while the Soul of Norway sings 
in my soul." 

. . . Years later it was Grieg who became the silent listener while the "Soul 
of Norway" sang in his soul. But the cause for Norwegian music was not 
won without constant perseverance and frequent discouragement. 

... Early in 1864 it was Grieg's good fortune to become a friend of a young 
Norwegian musician named Rikard Nordraak, composer of the Norwegian 
national anthem. Nordraak introduced Grieg to his personal collection 
of Norwegian folk songs and dances. He, too, wanted to create a Norwegian 
music in the tradition of the Norse race. Together they vowed to dedicate 
their lives towards freeing their country's music from German influences 
and encouraging the use of native folk sources. 

... At about this time he became engaged to his own first cousin, Nina 
Hagerup, a talented singer who later popularized his songs. Because 
of her parents' objections the marriage was delayed until 1867. Then 
in 1869 the tragic death of their first and only child, a thirteen- 
month-old girl plunged Edvard Grieg into a depression. 

... His despair was unexpectedly relieved when he received a letter from 

Rome, full of warmth, encouragement and appreciation. It was from Franz 
Liszt telling him that he was profoundly impressed by his Sonata in F 
for violin and piano. He added: "I could hope that you are finding 
in your own country the success and encouragement you deserve." 

... Eventually, as Grieg continued to compose and his fame spread throughout 
Europe, his own country did encourage and appreciate him. The government 
granted him an annual subsidy which assured him of financial security. 

... Among his many compositions his Concerto in A Minor is probably the most 
frequently performed. But his incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's play, 
Peer Gynt , is his most popular work. The Viennese critic, Eduard 
Hanslick prophesied that Ibsen's drama would survive only because of 
Grieg's music. 



11 



III. SONG: OLEANA 

Norwegian Folk Song 



Recording, Book 5 
Exploring Music 



Aocompaniment : 



Exploring Music Series, Book 5 
Holt, P.inehart & Winston, Inc. 



QLEANA IS PRINTED ON THE INSIDE FRONT COVER OF SYMPHONY STORIES. 
Children should memorize all four stanzas of the song to sing with 
the orchestra. They are not permitted to bring copies of the words 
or the music into the concert hall. 

Practice the song ahead of time, preferably without the aid of the piano, 
For school rehearsals you may want to use an autoharp to stabilize the 
beat, please do not bring the autoharp to the concert. 



Autoharp Chords 



Z p _ 



c>- 



TEACHING THE SONG 



F - 

F - 



B b - I F - 

C- F - 



Talk about Grieg' s interest in folk songs and how Norwegian folk 
tunes and dances were an inspiration to him when he was composing. 
Point out that Oleana begins with the Refrain . This is often the 
case in folk song singing. 

If possible, teach the Refrain in two parts. The verses may be 
sung in unison. 

The song is in 2/4 meter. In conducting, use a strong down beet on 
the "ones." For example: 



The preparatory beat will be an upbeat on "two." 



+wo -A. 



At the conclusion of the Grieg Holberg Suite The conductor will 
ask the children to stand. Tarn them to watch carefully for his 
signal, and to get up as quietly as possible. The orchestra will 
play an introduction before the conductor gives the audience the 
cue to start singing. Impress on your children the importance 
of watching the conductor at all times, and to make any changes 
in tempo or dynamics that he indicates. 



12 



IV. MARCH OF THE SIAMESE CHILDREN from "The King and I" B L #54 

Richard Rodgers, 1902 - 1979 Bowmar Orchestral 

Oscar Hammerstein II, 1695 - 1960 Library- 

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II were collaborators in the 
writing and production of a number of successful Broadway musicals. 
Richard Rodgers composed the music and Oscar Hammerstein II wrote the 
words. With Oklahoma t they were at the height of their careers. This 
musical, which continues to be popular with audiences all over the United 
States, was first staged in New York in 1943. The original choreography 
synthesized ballet movement and square dancing. Essentially a "folk" ins- 
pired work it brought together plot, music, and dance in such a way that 
critics heralded it as a new form of American opera. 

"The King and I" after many successful performances on Broadway 
a number of years ago is now having a revival during the present 
season. The famous collaborators, Rodgers and Hammerstein, are no 
longer alive to witness their continuing popularity, but theatre-goers 
in New York will again have the opportunity to hear the delightful music 
and enjoy the story of "Anna and the King of Siam." 

The scene was laid in Siam (now Thailand) during the time of the Civil 
War in America. Abraham Lincoln was President. The King of Siam, who 
was sympathetic to Lincoln' s efforts to free the slaves, offered to 
send him seme elephants to transport ammunition. You will find a summary 
of the plot in Symphony Stories, page 8. 

Things to do 

1) Talk about what has happened to Siam. Show meps. Discuss 
Thailand (TT-land) as it is to-day. (A constitutional monarchy 

in Southeast Asia; 198,404 square miles; estimated population, 1961, 
27,181,000; capital, Bangkok; surrounding countries, Burma, Laos, 
Cambodia, Malaya.) 

2) Read and discuss the story. Then list the characters and describe them 
in pantomimic dance movement: The King of Siam; Anna, the governess 
of the King's children; Anna's little boy: the Crown Prince; all the 
Siamese children, of different ages and sizes; attendants at the Palace. 

3) Listen to the music many times to help the children disoover that it 
is Oriental (instruments are gong, wood block, oymbal, temple blocks). 

4) Disoover the rhythm pattern, repeated many times: Ji. 

Play the pattern on different kinds of percussion instruments. 

5) The music of The March of the Siamese Children may be charted in 
seven sections: 

A B A C A 8 A 

You will notice that the "A" section returns after each new- 
theme is played. This is Rondo Form . 

6) Dramatize the entrance of the Siamese children as they are presented 
at court to their new governess. 



13 



V. SYMPHONY NO. 100 in G Major ("Military") M 34126 

Menuetto Columbia 

Finale 
Franz Joseph Haydn 
1732 - 1809 

During a period of four years, beginning on New Year's Day in 1791 and 
ending August 15, 1795, Haydn made two trips to London. He went at the 
invitation of Johann Saloman, an orchestra conductor, who made a contract 
with him to compose six symphonies and conduct them at a series of con- 
certs. The success of the first six was so great that he was commissioned 
by Mr. Saloman to write another set of six symphonies. 

It was on Haydn's second visit to London that he wrote the "Military" 
Symphony. It was performed in the spring of 1794. The name "Military" 
was given to the symphony because in the second movement Haydn's score 
calls for a large drum, brass cymbals, and a triangle — in addition 
to the tympani — to imitate the Turkish Janizary bands. Music of the 
Janizary, the military bodyguard of Turkish sovereigns, c. 1400 - 1826, 
was extremely popular in Europe around 1800. Mozart imitated it in his 
Abduction from the Seraglio , and in the Turkish March from his Piano 
Sonata in A. Beethoven also imitated it in his Ruins of Athens , and in 
the finale of his Ninth Symphony. Harpsichords and pianofortes of the 
late 18th century frequently were equipped with "Janizary" stops which 
made a rattling noise. 

Haydn's "Military" Symphony pleased the King so greatly that Haydn 
was specially presented to his Majesty by the Prince of Wales. And 
another happy aspect of the Saloman concerts was that Haydn is said 
to have made a net profit of $12,000, enough to relieve him of any 
financial anxiety connected with English visits. 

Things to Do 

1) Compare the size of Haydn's orchestra with the size of the 
usual symphony orchestra of to-day. When Joseph Haydn first 
became director of music for Prince Nicholas on the Esterhazy 
Estate there were seldom as many as sixteen musicians to take 
part in concerts and opera performances. Haydn constantly begged 

for more players. Finally, in 1785, his orchestra had grown to twenty- 
three players — twenty-four when he himself played the harpsichord. 

2) In 1790 Joseph Haydn went back to Vienna where he lived happily 
in a house of his own, compsing and giving lessons until he was 

an old man. His two most famous pupils were Mozart and Beethoven. 
Find out more about Haydn's relationships with these two composers. 
Consult the Bibliography for lists of books and filmstrips. 

3) On the outside back cover of Symphony Stories there is a Percussion 
Score to be played with a recording of the Third Movement of the 
"Military" Symphony ( Menuetto ) . Suggestions on teaching children 
how to play the Percussion Score are written on the following page. 



14 

THE PERCUSSION SCORE 

i 

MENUETTG from Haydn's SYMPHONY NO. 100 in Q MAJOR ("Military") M 34126 

Columbia 

THE PERCUSSION SCORE IS PRINTED ON THE OUTSIDE BACK COVER 
OF "SYMPHONY STORIES" 

Have eaoh child prop up the soore on his desk 
by placing a thick book on top of page 12, "Symphony Stories" 



Teaohing Procedures 



1. Explain to your children that the Percussion Score is for class- 
room use only. Do not bring percussion instruments to the concert. 

2. Arrange to have all the required percussion instruments at each 
ohild* s place ahead of time. Do not pass them out after the 
children arrive if you want to save time and avoid confusion. 

f 
Instruments needed: 
DRUMS 
MARACAS 
STICKS 

FINGER CYMBALS 
JINGLE BELLS 
BRASS CYMBALS 
TRIANGLES 
TAMBOURINES 
WOOD BLOCKS 

3. Play the reoording a number of times for listening only. 
Help the children to disoover for themselves that the Minuet 
is in three sections: 

A B (Trio) A 
The middle part, known as the Trio, is a contrast in mood and 
melodic feeling from the "A" sections. The tempo and rhythm 
remain steady throughout. 

4. Looking at the score explain the meter (3/4) and call attention to 
the fact that eaoh line of the score begins on the third beat. 

On lines 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 9 the third beat (upbeet) is a rest. 

5. There are three quarter notes, or their equivalent, in each measure. 
Let the ohildren discover some of the different note patterns 

and write them on the board: 

<MJJ*I b -U?i3.gl C -U*«T3I J -|J3I3 J3 I etc. 

6. Count the meter out loud: three \ one two three | one two three I 

> ? 

7. Clap the first beat in each measure, then "conduct" the score; 

3u 4, \ 



Mai ix.\ 



15 



VI. COLONEL BOGEY MARCH B L #54 

Kenneth J. Alford (pseud.) Bowmar Orchestral 

1881 - 1945 Library 

The composer of the Colonel Bogey March , Frederick J. Ricketts, 
used the pseudonym, "Kenneth J. Alford." He was born in London in 
1881 and died in Redgate, Surrey, in 1945. Alford's fame spread 
rapidly after his Colonel Bogey March was introduced in the movie, 
"Bridge on the River Kwai" in 1958. Because Alford was known as 
"the British Sousa" you may find it interesting to have your chil- 
dren learn more about "the American Sousa." His march, Stars and 
Stripes Forever is on the same recording with "Colonel Bogey." 

About the Composer, John Philip Sousa (1854 - 1932) 

... As a bandmaster, Sousa was internationally renowned. He was 
appointed leader of the Marine Band in 1880 and by 1891 he had 
made it into a balanced ensemble of forty-nine players which in- 
cluded 26 reeds, 20 brass and 3 percussion. 

. . . Sousa organized his own band in 1892 and toured with it through 
the United States , Canada, Europe and later all over the world. 

... As a composer, Sousa wrote many kinds of popular music, notably 

songs and operettas. But, it was as a composer of wind-band marches 
that he excelled. He lived at a time when the march was especially 
popular. It was basis of the repertory for military and parade 
bands as well as for village bands and it turned up at ballroom 
dances as music for the Two-Step of the 1890's. 

. . . Sousa composed about one hundred and forty marches between 1876 and 
1931. He believed in entertaining the public rather than in trying 
to educate, but his musical standards and taste were of high quality. 
Comparing himself to Theodore Thomas who had a great symphony or- 
chestra he said: "Each of us was reaching an end, but through dif- 
ferent methods. He gave Wagner, Liszt, and Tschaikowsky , in the 
belief that he was educating his public; I gave Wagner, Liszt and 
Tschaikowsky with the hope that I was entertaining my public. 

Listening Highlights - THE STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER 

The typical Sousa March is fairly short, in duple meter (2/4, 2/2, 
or 6/8.) The framework follows a conventional pattern. 

After playing the recording of Stars and Stripes a number of 
times, let children try to work out something about its structure: 
Introduction 4 measures 

First theme 16 measures (repeated) 

Second theme 16 measures (repeated) 

Trio 32 measures 

Break 24 measures 

Trio Louder with piccolo counter-melody 

Break 24 measures 

Trio Counter-melody in trombones 

Stimulate children's creative ideas about playing simple percussion 
instruments in different sections; or, perhaps developing movement. 



16 

VII. SONG: I MAY NOT PASS THIS WAY AGAIN Reoording, Book 5 

Words and music by Rod MoKuen Exploring Musio 

Aooompaniment t Exploring Musio Series, Book 5 
Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc. 

I MAY NOT PASS THIS WAY AGAIN IS PRINTED ON THE INSIDE BACK COVER 

OF SYMPHONY STORIES 
Children should memorize all three stanzas of the song to sing with 
the orohestra at the ooncert. 3efore the conductor invites the audience 
to stand and sing, your selected school instrumental group will play the 
song through once. There should be a teaoher-conduotor in charge of 
this group. They must have the music memorized in order to follow 
the teacher's direotion. 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PLAYING 

The Instrument players are "on their own" and will not be aocompanied 
by the orchestra. Instruments to include in the group may be small 
wind instruments, suoh as tonettes, melody or song flutes; reoorders; 
violins; melody or tone bells and autoharps. 

1) Wind instruments and strings play the entire song. 

2) Bells play 3rd, 4th, and 6th lines. 

3) Autoharps play the ohords as printed on page 12 of Symphony Stories . 
As an introduction sound three strong C-chords. 

TEACHING THE SONG 

The song is in 2/2 meter. There are two beats to the measure. In 
conducting use a definite strong down beat on the "ones." As follows: 

,-hvo 



I 






Since the first measure is incomplete, starting on the last half of 
the first beat, a possible preparation might be: 

/ ! 

; 
/ p 

» i 

'' V one 

Before the audience stands to sing, the orohestra will play the 
last two lines of the song as an introduction. 

Tell your children to watch the orohestra conductor oarefully 
during the singing, and to make any changes in tempo or dynamios 
that he indicates. 



17 



VIII. L'ARLESIENNE - SUITES NO. 1 and NO. 2 - 1872 B L #78 

Minuet Bowmar Orchestral 

Farandole Library OR 

Georges Bizet PMC 7024 Stereo 

1838 - 1875 Quintessence 

When the French dramatist, Alphonse Daudet, asked Georges Bizet to 
write incidental music for his play, "L'Arlesienne," (The Woman of 
Aries) he was delighted. Bizet had a life-long interest in the stage, 
as well as a great talent for orchestration that was colorful and 
imaginative. This was a requisite in 1872 when a composer of inciden- 
tal music had to write his score for the players the theatre happened 
to employ. The Vaudeville, the Parisian theatre at which L' Arlesienne 
was to be produced, had an orchestra of twenty-six pieces — seven violins, 
one viola, five cellos, two double basses, two flutes, one oboe, one clari- 
net, two bassoons., one saxophone, two horns, kettledrums, and piano. It 
was an odd assortment of instruments, but with Bizet's talent the music 
turned out to be something of a masterpiece. 

Listening Highlights for the Minuet 

As children listen to the recording of the Minuet help them to 
discover Bizet's use of instruments: 

A - Dance Movement 

a Violins 

b Woodwinds, strings (Question and answer) 
B - Trio 

c Scraping sounds in open fifths to imitate bagpipes and 
a drone bass 

d Singing theme - Clarinets and saxophone, with a soft melody 

for strings weaving in and out 

e Codetta - Solo oboe and strings 
A - As above 

The Story of L'Arlesienne 

The plot of "L'Arlesienne" is not a children's story. The scene 
is laid in Provence at the old farmstead of Castelet. Frederi, the 
young son of the house, is madly in love with a beautiful dark-eyed woman 
of Aries, who never appears in the play. As the family are about to cele- 
brate Frederi's engagement to L'Arlesienne, a stranger arrives with let- 
ters, proving that the woman of Aries is a common adventuress. She has 
taken advantage of Frederi's love to become the mistress of the rich 
estate of Castelet. 

The engagement party is off, and Frederi is brokenhearted. The boy's 
mother fears that he will commit suicide, but his uncle reassures her, say- 
ing: "One dies of pleurisy, a crack in the head, or is swept overboard 
by a big wave . . . but luckily, one does not die of love." 

Later in the play Frederi decides to marry his childhood friend and 
playmate, Vivette. At the betrothal celebration, the stranger reappears. 
The memory of his old love for the beautiful L'Arlesienne sweeps over 
him, and in despair he throws himself from an upper window. As he lies 
dead on the stones below, the play ends with these lines, "Look from this 
window and you will know whether or not one dies of love!" 



18 



MOVEMENT 



iftitfftti 



MOVEMENT is a child's natural medium of expression. He uses it as an extension 
of listening to deepen his impressions of the music he hears. He is often able 
to "dance" his impressions of musical experiences more effectively than to ex- 
press them in words. Movement may be a means of stimulating his imagination and 
of encouraging his innate desire to create. It may also be an outlet for frus- 
tration or for an emotional problem. With all children movement promotes a sense 
of physical well being; and it offers a change of activity to relieve fatigue 
during the school day. 

LISTENING requires concentration. It is not merely "hearing" the sound of music; 
it is giving one's whole attention to it. First listening experiences usually 
reflect vague impressions such as the over-all mood. Children hear the obvious 
parts of the composition — ■ changes from loud to soft, strong rhythmic pulse, fast 
and slow tempos, repetition of familiar patterns; sudden accents, outstanding in- 
struments , etc. In guiding children's responses it may be helpful at times to 
point out a certain specific element for concentrated listening. Awareness of the 
many elements will develop gradually as new concepts are built. THE LISTENER 
NEEDS TO HEAR THE MUSIC MANY TIMES. 

IN BUILDING CHILDREN'S AWARENESS of musical elements some teachers may find it 
useful to refer to a check list from time to time: 

CHECK LIST OF MUSICAL ELEMENTS FOR SPECIFIC LISTENING 



DYNAMIC CHANGES 

MELODIC CONTRASTS 

RHYTHMIC CONTRASTS 

TEMPO CHANGES 

MOOD 

CHANGE OF KEY 

SCALE 

STRUCTURE 

FORM 

TEXTURE 



Loud, soft, accented, sudden or gradual 

High, low, small range, large range, staccato, legato 

Change of meter, varied rhythmic patterns 

Fast, slow, moderate, sudden, gradual 

Lively, serious, happy, sad, wistful, turbulent, etc. 

Major, minor, atonal, modal 

Pentatonic, diatonic, whole tone, modal, 12-tone row, 

chromatic 

Section, phrase, theme 

A A, A A B A, A B C A, Rondo -ABACADA, etc. 

Linear, chordal, contrapuntal, many voices or instruments, 

few voices or instruments, solo 



Books about Movement 



Driver , Ann 
Gray, Vera & 
Percival, Rachel 

Russell, Joan 



Spencer, Cornelia 



MUSIC AND MOVEMENT 

MUSIC, MOVEMENT AND MIME FOR CHILDREN 

Recording : Listen, Move & Dance 

(Electronic music and instrumental selections) 

CREATIVE DANCE IN THE PRIMARY SCHOOL 

(Highly recommended for all ages: an excellent 

philosophy on the importance of free movement 

versus patterned dances) 

HOW ART AND MUSIC SPEAK TO US 



Oxford Univ. Press 
Oxford Univ. Press 
Cap H - 21007 

Praeger 



John Day 



Some Suggestions to New Teachers 

1. Set aside in your schedule one or two regular times each week for dancing. 

2. Clear as large a space as possible. Let the children clean the floor and 
move their own desks or tables according to an established routine. 

3. Take off shoes and socks. Contact of bare feet on the floor helps in "feeling" 
the rhythm. Also, children are able to hear the music better without the sound 
of shoes (Rhythm sandals or sneakers are 0. K.) 

4. Let each child begin by finding a space on the floor where he can spread his 
arms out as far as possible without touching another dancer. 

5. In order to encourage children to utilize all the floor space, suggest that 
they constantly keep dancing "to the edges." To emphasize keeping as much 
space as possible between dancers as they move over the floor, suggest that 
they "go through the holes." 

6. Let children explore different levels by moving high in the air, by moving at 
an in-between level, or by moving near to or even on the floor. Move to the 
left, right, forward, backward. 

7. Use the whole body — legs, arms, back, face, torso, fingers, head, eyes, knees, 
feet, ankles, wrists, etc. 

8. If your class is large, divide it into three groups. One way to accomplish 
this is to let the children number themselves; one, two, three — one, two, 
three, etc. Do not always have the same children in each group. Vary the 
way you choose by such devices as calling names alphabetically, letting 
children choose, taking names with "two letters, three letters, four letters," 
etc., asking those who most want to dance a number to volunteer. Children 
like to be chosen by colors — "those with pink dresses, red socks, blue 
shirts, brown eyes," etc. 

9. Before attempting to dance with music, be sure that your group has heard the 
music many times, and is feeling it "from within." 

10. When your class begins moving to music, say as little as possible in order to 
build up an atmosphere of listening. A good way to encourage quiet is to stop 
the music from time to time and see if the dancers can carry on in silence, 
still "listening" inside to the music they have been hearing. 

11. As the children continue to dance, their movement will be more expressive when 
they have become thoroughly familiar with the content of the music. For in- 
stance, they will hear changes in tempo or dynamics; melodic rise and fall; 
change in mood; phrasing; pattern; etc. 

12. Don't always be an observer. Take off your shoes and dance! 

13. Sometimes let the children initiate original movement without following music. 
Drums, other instruments, or vocal sounds may be used as accompaniment. 

14. Also use poetry, stories, words, paintings, textile designs, movements of 
natural and medhanical objects to stimulate dance ideas. 



*u 



Warm-up Ideas to Initiate Creative Movement 



MIRROR DANCE 



ALTER EGO 



Two children, facing each other. One is chosen as a "leader" 
to initiate different movements which his partner imitates. 
Reverse, letting the other child become the leader. Then, 
instead of imitating make movements as different as possible 
from the other partner. 

One child is seated on the floor with several instruments, such 
as a drum, a maraca, a xylophone, cymbals. He "composes" 
at random while his partner makes up original movement to fit 
his musical sounds. Reverse the roles of the two children. 



SPACE 



Try out the limits of the floor space by: 

...Moving to the edges, passing through, but not touching 

other dancers. Return to the center, then back to the edges 

and be quick to turn or reverse direction so as not to get 

in the way of anyone else. 
...Move forward, backward, in a diagonal, a circle, a spiral, 

zig-zag, figure eight, triangle, square. 
...Move upward, downward, from side to side, flat on the floor, 

climb the wall, whirl. 



TEMPO 



Move fast; move slowly; gradually faster and slower. 

. . .What starts slowly and moves faster and faster? (Train, 

car, airplane, etc.) 
...What starts fast and moves more and more slowly? (A top, a 

wind-up toy, etc.) 



5. 


SHAPE 

& 
SIZE 


6. 


PATTERN 


7, 


LEVELS 


8. 


HEAVY 

& 
LIGHT 



WORDS 



10. PANTOMINE 



Make big movements: A big round snow man, an elephant, a 

giant, a bull-dozer, etc. 
Make small movements: An ant, a baby bird, a tiny spider, etc. 

Clap and dance names of flowers, children, food, birds. 

Stretch up and move as high as possible; as low as possible, and 
at a middle level. 

Lift a heavy weight; push a heavy weight; pull a heavy weight; 
stuck in molasses, moving every way trying to get unstuck; 
Float up and float down; dance: feathers, leaves, falling snow, 
soap bubbles. 

People : Queen, grandmother, cowboy, astronaut, baby crawling, a 

lady having tea, cowboy, nurse, doctor, dentist 
Animals : Snake, rabbit, turtle, hippopotamus, kitty, goat, cow, etc, 
Mechanical objects: Washing machine, windshield wiper, egg beater 

crane, oil well pump, helicopter, etc. 
Natural phenomena : Wind, rain, hail, ice storn, hurricane, etc. 

Dramatize poems, stories, scenes from plays, ballets, etc. 
Use movement to describe a spinning top; a ball game; sand; 
stars; a fox hunt. 



FINGER PAINTING 



FINGER PAINTING, unlike painting with brushes, furnishes a simple, direct way 
of extending the child's listening experiences. The medium is not demanding, 
and it offers a high degree of tactile satisfaction. To be successful with 
a group of children, the situation must be carefully prepared in advance. 

Materials Necessary for Finger Painting 

Smooth surfaced tables (enamel, masonite, linoleum tops or hardwood) of height 
comfortable for child to stand and reach the entire area of the paper. 

Finger paints of good quality. (Not made of starch or other substitutes). 
Preferably buy the original Ruth Shaw finger paints prepared by Binney & Smith, 
from Southern School Supply, Raleigh, N. C. Colors: Black, red, blue and green. 

Other materials needed: some newspaper, a dipping pan, glazed finger paint paper, 
a sprinkling can, a pail to wash in, a pencil, tongue depressors, paper towels, 
old shirts or aprons, absorbent cloths, a tablespoon, and an electric iron. 

SUGGESTIONS FOR USING WITH MUSIC: Let everyone experiment with the paint and 
paper for some time before introducing music. Then listen to the recording once 
or twice before beginning to paint. Always observe this rule: 

START AND STOP WITH THE MUSIC 

Steps in Finger Painting 

1. Roll sleeves above elbow, and put on apron. 

2. Put folded sheet of newspaper on floor to receive finished painting. 

3. Half fill pail of cool water, placing near it 2 absorbent cloths for cleaning up. 

4. Have ready a pan of water 4" by 17" (or cafeteria tray) for submerging paper. 

5. Place open jars on supply table along with tongue depressors for easy access. 

6. Write name and date on rough or matte side of paper. 

7. Roll paper in small cylinder and submerge in dripping pan. Unroll, pulling 
under, up and out of water until both sides of sheet are thoroughly wet. 
Allow excess water to drip back into pan. 

8. Lay wet sheet on table and smooth out air bubbles and wrinkles. 

9. Take jar of chosen color to table with tablespoon and depressor. 

10. Put 3 level tbsps. of finger paint in center of paper. 

11. Replace jar of paint on supply table. 

12. Mash paint with palm of hand until it is smooth and soft. 

13. Sprinkle with water and spread over entire page. 

14. Add sprinkle of water now and then to keep moist until painting is finished. 

15. Wash arms and hands before removing the painting. 

16. Lift paper carefully at upper right corner until sheet is loosened from table. 

17. Carry, spread between 2 hands, and lay on newspaper to dry. 

18. Clean up finger paints from table, spoons, tongue depressors. 

19. Return jar lids and jars to storage shelf. 

20. Empty pans of water and dry thoroughly to avoid rust. 

21. Later, when painting is dry, press it with a warm iron on matte side. 

DISPLAY OF PAINTINGS. As important as the actual finger painting experience is, 
children should have an opportunity to display their work, and to tell their class- 
mates about it. If space is limited they might just stand in front of the class and 
hold up each painting. If bulletin board space is available, the paintings can be 
mounted and hung. 



21 



22 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Books 



Films Films trips 



BOOKS 



About Composers 



Day, Lillian 
Deucher, Sybil 
Mirsky, Reba Paeff 
Young, Percy M. 
Weil, Ann 
Graham, Alberta P. 



GRIEG 

EDVARD GRIEG, BOY OF THE NORTHLAND 

HAYDN 

HAYDN 

JOHN PHILIP SOUS A 

GREAT BANDS OF AMERICA (Sousa) 



Hyperion 

Dutton 

Follett 

White 

Bobbs 

Nelson 



About Instruments 



The Orchestra 



Allen, Robert T. 
Baines , Anthony 
Bonner, Mary G. 
Bunche, Jane 

Ewen, David 
Greene, Car la 
Surplus, Robert W. 
Suggs, William W. 



THE VIOLIN 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS THROUGH THE AGES 

WONDERS OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (children) 

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE INSTRUMENTS OF THE 
ORCHESTRA 

INSTRUMENTAL CHAMBER MUSIC (children) 

LET'S LEARN ABOUT THE ORCHESTRA (children) 

FOLLOW THE LEADER: THE STORY OF CONDUCTING 

MEET THE ORCHESTRA 



McGraw 
Walker 
Lantern 
Golden Press 

Watts 

Harvey House 
Lerner 
MacMillan 



Stories of Interest 



Berger, Gilda 
Goodenow, Earle 
Lovejoy, Bahija 
Shay, Arthur 



KUWAIT AND THE RIM OF ARABIA 

THE ARABIAN NIGHTS 

TWO BOYS OF BAGDAD 

WHAT IT'S LIKE TO BE A MUSICIAN 



Watts 
Grosset 
Lothrop 
Reilly & Lee 



23 



About Opera 
Cross, Milton 

Gass & Weinstock 
Streatfield, Noel 



NEW MILTON CROSS' COMPLETE STORIES OF THE Doubleday 
GREAT OPERAS (children) 

THROUGH AN OPERA GLASS Abelard 

THE FIRST BOOK OF THE OPERA (children) Watts 



FILMS and FILMSTRIPS 

Films available from the North Carolina Public Library Film Service: 

MARCHING ALONG WITH SOUS A 

BRASS CHOIR 

FIDDLE DE DEE 

INSTRUMENTS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

Films available from U. N. C. Audio-Visual Department, 111 Abernethy Hall, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. Send for latest catalog. 

BRASSES 

WOODWINDS 

PERCUSSION 

STRINGS 

STORY OF A VIOLIN 



Films trips 
Jam Handy Series 



Great Composers 
Series 

Great Masters 
of Music Series 

Biographies of 
Great Composers 
Series 

Arthur Meriwether 



INSTRUMENTS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

6 color filmstrips & 6 recordings 

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN - //HAR-1810 



HAYDN, FATHER OF THE SYMPHONY - //KR-2 



HAYDN - Bowmar #282 



THE FIRST DRUM - Part I 

How Music Began 

1976 42 frames 6 min. Gr . K - 5 



Prentice Hall, Inc. 
Education Division 

Prentice Hall 



Keyboard 



Bowmar 



Resources 
Contemporary 
Drama Service 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00766 4006